New professorship in tissue engineering links Institute for Molecular Engineering and Marine Biological Laboratory

The starlet sea anemone (Nematostella) is an emerging model organism for the study of regeneration.The University of Chicago is creating a new professorship in tissue engineering to promote innovative work at the University’s Institute for Molecular Engineering and the Marine Biological Laboratory, supported by a $3.5 million donation from the Millicent and Eugene Bell Foundation.

The Eugene Bell Professorship in Tissue Engineering will reside within the Institute for Molecular Engineering. That endowed chair holder also will direct a research project at the MBL’s Eugene Bell Center for Regenerative Biology and Tissue Engineering, and will have an appointment at the Bell Center. The MBL and UChicago formed an affiliation in 2013 to advance biological research and education at both institutions.

Tissue engineering and regenerative biology have the potential to produce breakthroughs in healing damaged body parts or even growing new organs. They are inherently multidisciplinary fields, drawing from new technology in materials science and fabrication as well as basic research in fields such as genetics and cell biology.

“The emerging collaborations between scientists at the University and the MBL are well suited to address the scientific challenges of tissue engineering,” said President Robert J. Zimmer. “Many innovations in medical treatments depend on robust links of basic research and new technology. We are grateful for the generous support of the Millicent and Eugene Bell Foundation, which will allow our scholars to do pioneering work in the rapidly changing field of tissue engineering.”

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